List of phones that come with the Carrier IQ spyware

Carrier IQ is a spyware program for mobile phones that has been in the news a fair amount in recent weeks. It is able to record many things including the list of installed apps, the location of the device, buttons pressed including keystrokes on the soft keyboard, and the content of messages. This data is sent to the Carrier IQ servers and then onto the mobile service provider which can be used for generating statistics or further relayed onto third parties such as advertisers, and law enforcement. This program cannot be uninstalled without rooting the phone.

While service providers and Carrier IQ claim that they do not store the content of messages, it has been found that they are infact doing this. They claim that this is a bug, and they are working on a fix.

Currently in the US, AT&T and T-Mobile include this program in their phones, while Verizon has made clear that they do not use it.

From an alleged T-Mobile document it appars that the following phones contain Carrier IQ:

  • HTC Amaze 4G
  • Samsung Galaxy S II
  • Samsung Exhibit II 4G
  • T-Mobile myTouch by LG
  • T-Mobile myTouch Q by LG
  • LG DoublePlay
  • BlackBerry 9900
  • BlackBerry 9360
  • BlackBerry 9810

So, I’d steer clear of any of those phones on AT&T or T-Mobile if I were you. (In fact I’d steer clear of those networks alltogether! :p)

Mobile operators in the UK do not use Carrier IQ.

via: The Verge

Flash and the mobiles

The smartphone market is finally getting a full-fledged flash player. Adobe’s CTO Kevin Lynch demonstrated Flash 10 running on Nokia Series 60 (based on Symbian), Windows Mobile and even the Google Android platforms. There was a major but expected absentee … The iPhone.

The smartphone market is finally getting a full-fledged flash player. Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch demonstrated Flash 10 running on Nokia Series 60 (based on Symbian), Windows Mobile and even the Google Android platforms. There was a major but expected absentee … The iPhone.

While Adobe has a near complete version for the iPhone, it’ll probably never be released to the wild. The problem as some see it is that it is too close for comfort for Apple, providing a free application platform that would compete with the App Store. They would lose the tight control they have on what can be run on an iPhone, as well as losing the revenue stream from sales via the App Store.
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